Political Standoff in Jordan

The demonstration of Friday, October 5, 2012 in front of the Husseini Mosque in Amman was the biggest demonstration in Jordan since the Arab uprising began. For the time being, that is a piece of good news for the Jordanian opposition, maybe the only one. Under the banner of "Save the Nation," the organizers, mostly the Islamic Action Front, which encompasses the Muslim Brotherhood and some seventy different opposition groups, cannot be satisfied with 10,000 participants, once they publicly raised the bar, working for weeks to hold a demonstration of 50,000 people in the spirit of the Egyptian "Millioniya."

The various security agencies judged in advance the inability of the organizers to mobilize 50,000 people, and the counter, pro-government demonstration was cancelled. Prime Minister Faez Tarwaneh felt confident and safe enough to leave Amman the day before and meet the Palestinian President and Prime Minister in Ramallah. At the same time, if any internal political dividends were expected from this visit, few could be collected – the Palestinian issue is almost non-existent on the opposition's agenda.

But King Abdullah II cannot enjoy the opposition's failure to reach the numerical target for long. The opposition's major demands were sounded loud and clear from the center of Amman in front of the Husseini Mosque, as well as through all the media channels that were not barred from reporting: a constitutional monarchy, a parliament elected in a fully democratic system, a genuine campaign against corruption, independence of the judicial system, and end of the involvement of the security agencies in political and civilian affairs. The most difficult demand is of course the electoral system and the powers of the king. The stalemate on this issue remains unresolved...

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Political Standoff in Jordan

The demonstration of Friday, October 5, 2012 in front of the Husseini Mosque in Amman was the biggest demonstration in Jordan since the Arab uprising began. For the time being, that is a piece of good news for the Jordanian opposition, maybe the only one. Under the banner of "Save the Nation," the organizers, mostly the Islamic Action Front, which encompasses the Muslim Brotherhood and some seventy different opposition groups, cannot be satisfied with 10,000 participants, once they publicly raised the bar, working for weeks to hold a demonstration of 50,000 people in the spirit of the Egyptian "Millioniya."

The various security agencies judged in advance the inability of the organizers to mobilize 50,000 people, and the counter, pro-government demonstration was cancelled. Prime Minister Faez Tarwaneh felt confident and safe enough to leave Amman the day before and meet the Palestinian President and Prime Minister in Ramallah. At the same time, if any internal political dividends were expected from this visit, few could be collected – the Palestinian issue is almost non-existent on the opposition's agenda.

But King Abdullah II cannot enjoy the opposition's failure to reach the numerical target for long. The opposition's major demands were sounded loud and clear from the center of Amman in front of the Husseini Mosque, as well as through all the media channels that were not barred from reporting: a constitutional monarchy, a parliament elected in a fully democratic system, a genuine campaign against corruption, independence of the judicial system, and end of the involvement of the security agencies in political and civilian affairs. The most difficult demand is of course the electoral system and the powers of the king. The stalemate on this issue remains unresolved...

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.